How to Tie a Crankbait: Best Knots to Use With Crankbaits


Fishing with crankbaits is something that every serious angler will learn sooner or later, and when you’re ready to fish crankbaits you’ll want to pick up the best crankbait along the best equipment tackle, line, and even the best knot giving you an edge with life-like presentation and strength to set the big fish. How to Tie a Crankbait: Best Knots to Use With Crankbaits

  • Select an appropriate fishing line
  • Choose a suitable knot, a non-slip loop knot like the Clinch knot
  • Thread line through a crankbait eyelet
  • Create a loop and wrap the tag end around the main line
  • Thread tag ends through the loop
  • Moisten the knot and cinch tight
  • Trim the excess tag end
  • Test knot for security

Crankbaits are a great hard bait to use when an angler needs to cover a larger area of water faster at various depths making them a shallow medium or deep diving lure capable of long days and rough conditions as long as they’re tied off properly.

Introduction:

Tying a crankbait onto your fishing line is a fundamental skill for anglers seeking to lure in elusive fish species. The process involves securing the crankbait firmly to your line to ensure it moves naturally through the water, mimicking the movement of prey and enticing bites. Mastering this technique not only enhances your fishing experience but also increases your chances of landing a prized catch. In this guide, we’ll explore the step-by-step process of tying a crankbait, providing you with the knowledge and confidence to tackle any fishing adventure with success.

How to Tie a Crankbait: Best Knots to Use With Crankbaits

Tying a crankbait usually refers to attaching it to your fishing line. Here’s a step-by-step guide to tying a crankbait onto your fishing line:

  1. Select Your Fishing Line: Choose an appropriate fishing line for your crankbait. Monofilament, fluorocarbon, and braided lines are common choices, each with its advantages.
  2. Choose the Right Knot: The most common knot for tying on a crankbait is the improved clinch knot. It’s simple and strong, ideal for securing your lure. How to Tie a CRANKBait! EASY Fishing Line Knot! How to Tie the Palomar Knot. Fast Fishing Knots - YouTube
  3. Thread the Line Through the Lure: Pass the end of your fishing line through the eyelet or split ring on the front of the crankbait. Ensure there’s enough line to work with for tying the knot.
  4. Create a Loop: Leave a small tag end (about 5-6 inches) and create a loop by doubling the line back on itself.
  5. Wrap the Tag End Around the Main Line: Take the tag end and wrap it around the main line, going back towards the loop you created. Make 5 to 7 wraps.
  6. Thread the Tag End Through the Loop: Pass the tag end through the loop you created just above the eyelet or split ring of the crankbait.
  7. Moisten the Knot: Before tightening the knot, moisten it with some saliva or water. This reduces friction and helps the knot cinch down smoothly.
  8. Pull Tight: Hold the tag end and the main line and pull them in opposite directions to cinch the knot down snugly. Make sure the wraps are tight and secure.
  9. Trim the Tag End: Once the knot is tightened, trim the excess tag end close to the knot using a pair of scissors or line clippers.
  10. Test the Knot: Give the knot a gentle tug to ensure it’s secure. It should hold firm without slipping or coming loose.
  11. Repeat if Necessary: If you’re using a lure with multiple hooks or if you want extra security, you can tie an additional knot using the same process.
  12. Check for Smooth Movement: After tying the crankbait, ensure that it moves freely without any restrictions from the knot or the line.

By following these steps, you can securely tie a crankbait onto your fishing line, ready to attract those elusive fish.

When anglers are looking for a knot to use with their crankbaits anglers need a strong knot like the standard Clinch knot. A crankbait tied with fluorocarbon or braid is the way to go that will allow your crankbait to dive to appropriate depths looking natural side-to-side and up and down movement underwater.

Types of Crankbaits

There are several types of crankbaits, each designed for specific fishing conditions and techniques. Here are some common types of fishing bait:

  1. Squarebill Crankbaits: These crankbaits have a square-shaped diving bill, which allows them to deflect off covers such as rocks, stumps, and vegetation without getting snagged easily. They are ideal for shallow-water fishing and are often used in bass fishing.
  2. Roundbill Crankbaits: Roundbill crankbaits have a rounded diving bill that helps them dive deeper than squarebill crankbaits. They are effective for targeting fish at various depths and can be used in both shallow and deep water.
  3. Lipless Crankbaits: Lipless crankbaits do not have a diving bill like traditional crankbaits. Instead, they have a sleek, aerodynamic shape that allows them to sink quickly and swim at various depths. They are effective for covering large areas of water and can be retrieved at different speeds.
  4. Deep Diving Crankbaits: These crankbaits have a long, slender body and a large diving bill, allowing them to dive to greater depths than other types of crankbaits. They are ideal for fishing in deep water or targeting fish suspended at deeper depths.
  5. Floating Crankbaits: Floating crankbaits are designed to float on the surface of the water until you start retrieving them. Once retrieved, they dive to a specific depth depending on their design and can be used to target fish at various depths in the water column.
  6. Suspending Crankbaits: Suspending crankbaits are designed to suspend at a specific depth in the water column when paused during the retrieve. This makes them ideal for fishing over structures or targeting suspended fish.
  7. Jointed Crankbaits: These crankbaits have a segmented body with multiple joints, allowing them to swim with a more lifelike action compared to traditional crankbaits. They are effective for imitating injured or struggling baitfish.
  8. Swimbait Crankbaits: Swimbait crankbaits combine the profile of a crankbait with the swimming action of a swimbait. They are effective for targeting larger predatory fish and can be retrieved at various speeds to mimic different types of prey.

These are just a few examples of the many types of crankbaits available to anglers. Each type has its unique characteristics and applications, so it’s essential to choose the right crankbait for the fishing conditions and the species of fish you’re targeting.

Clinch knot (known simply as “the fisherman’s knot”) Rig for Crank bait

The clinch knot, a word often referred to as “the fisherman’s knot,” is one of the most widely used knots in fishing. It’s a reliable and relatively easy knot to tie, making it popular among anglers of all skill levels. The knot is versatile and can be used to attach hooks, lures, and swivels to the fishing line, and easy to learn how to tie a spinner bait, crank bait, or any lures. Used with Carolina rig or Texas rig fishing rig or even a Bobber rig.  The fishing knot design allows it to cinch down securely, providing confidence that your tackle will stay attached during intense battles with fish. Learning to tie the clinch knot is essential for any angler looking to improve their fishing skills and increase their success on the water. Improved Clinch Knot - How to tie an Improved Clinch Knot | Fishing Knots in 2024 | Fishing hook knots, Clinch knot, Fishing knots

For crankbaits and some other applications that don’t require hard hooksets, tie a standard Clinch knot (once known simply as “the fisherman’s knot”)

  • Strong connection
  • Easy to tie Knot
  • Quick
  • Works well with all line types with a simple improvement
  • Won’t cut into the fluorocarbon line
  • Allows for life-like dives and action

If you Tie the fluoro fishing line directly to the crankbait it does away with any chance that the line fails from any sharp edges from rings or swivel. Tieing directly to the crankbait will improve action and presentation when fishing for bass. Using a polymer knot among others can cut into itself setting a crankbait can be duty work.

If you Tie the fluoro line directly to the crankbait it does away with any chance that the line fails from any sharp edges from rings or swivel. Tieing directly to the crankbait will improve action and presentation when fishing for bass. Using a polymer knot among others can cut into itself setting a crankbait can be duty work.

Many anglers including myself consider the Clinch knot to be the best knot for fishing bass with lures. Not only is this knot versatile enough for securing your line to a lure, swivel, clip, or artificial fly, but it retains up to 95% of the original line strength

How Do You Fish Crankbaits?

Lipless Crankbaits (no bill)-12 ft.+ depth slow retrieve in Spring & Fall
Lipped Crankbait (have a bill)-2 to 12 ft. Use “twitching” motion-snap lure side to side in place with a slow retrieve
Square-shaped bill Crankbait ..…………………………………………………………………………….. Read more

Tie Non-Slip Loop Knot Fishing Crankbaits-Lipless Crankbait

Another knot that works great with fishing a Crankbait is called a Non-slip loop knot is the best fishing knot to attach crankbaits and lipless crankbait for bass because the knot allows for smoother side-to-side natural action of the lure. Very easy to tie a non-slip loop knot in a pinch (not quite as fast as the Clinch knot).

This is another way to tie a crankbait without using a clip, ring, or swivel. Tie directly to the lure for the movement and presentation. Giving the crankbait lifelike qualities that other knots won’t give.

How to tie the Non-Slip Loop Knot or Kreh Loop Knot. The Non-Slip Mono Loop is also known as the “Kreh Loop” as it has been popularized by fishing legend Lefty Kreh. As its name suggests it forms a non-slip loop at the end of a fishing line.

The loop connection to a fly or a lure can give the fly or lure more natural action. Some fishermen find the Loop knot easier to tie than the similar Rapala Knot and equally reliable. The Non-Slip Loop Knot is one of 12 great fishing knots included  Pro’s on the Pro-Knot Fishing Knot

  • Make an overhand knot in the line about 10 inches from the end. Pass the tag end through the hook eye and back through the loop of the overhand knot.
  • Wrap the tag end around the standing part 4 or 5 times. Bring the tag end back through the overhand knot, entering from the same side it exited from before.
  • Moisten the knots then pull slowly on the tag end to cinch the wraps loosely together. Then pull the loop and the standing line in opposite directions to seat the knot. Trim tag end.

Snell Knot Commonly Used With a Crankbait

The Snell Knot used with a Crank bait is a popular and highly effective fishing knot used to secure a hook to the fishing line, especially when targeting large fish. Try this:

  • To tie a snell knot, start by threading the tag end of the line through the eye of the hook, pulling several inches through.
  • Form a loop by bringing the tag end back towards the mainline and holding it against the hook’s shank.
  • Wrap the tag end around the hook shank and mainline, starting at the hook eye and moving towards the hook bend, making 7-10 tight coils.
  • Once the wraps are complete, thread the tag end back through the loop near the hook eye and pull it snug.
  • Ensure the coils are neatly stacked and tighten the knot by pulling both the mainline and tag end.
  • Trim the excess tag end for a clean finish. The snell knot is favored for its strength and ability to keep the hook in an optimal position, providing better hook sets and increasing the likelihood of landing a catch.

The snell knot is favored for its strength and ability (fly fishing) to keep the hook in an optimal position, providing better hook sets and increasing the likelihood of landing a catch.

Palomar Knot is Similar to the Snell Knot For Use With a Crankbait

The Palomar knot used for Crankbait fishing is renowned for its strength and simplicity, making it a favorite among anglers for tying a hook, swivel, or any fishing bait lure to the fishing line. To tie a Palomar knot, follow these steps:

  1. Double the Line: Start by doubling about 6 inches of your fishing line and passing the loop through the eye of your hook or lure.
  2. Tie an Overhand Knot: With the hook hanging from the loop, tie a loose overhand knot, just as you would when starting to tie your shoelaces, but do not tighten it yet.
  3. Pass the Hook Through the Loop: Take the looped end of the line and pass it over the hook, ensuring it goes around the entire hook or lure.
  4. Tighten the Knot: Moisten the line to reduce friction and carefully pull both the standing line and the tag end to tighten the knot evenly. Ensure the knot is snug against the hook eye, and the loop is securely around the hook.
  5. Trim the Tag End: Use scissors or a knife to trim the excess tag end, leaving about 1/8 inch to avoid slippage.

The Palomar knot is highly regarded for its strong, reliable hold and is particularly effective with braided lines. Its straightforward tying process and exceptional durability make it a go-to knot for many fishing situations.

Conclusion:

Crankbaits are a great hard bait to use when an angler needs to cover a larger area of water faster at various depths making them a shallow medium or deep diving lure capable of long days and rough conditions as long as they’re tied off properly. The best fishing knots to use tieing crankbaits are a standard Clinch knot along a Non-Slip Loop Knot (Kreh Loop Knot) both knots are strong, easy to tie, & allow the crankbaits or any artificial lures to be tied directly to the lure allowing it more life-like action & presentation underwater.

Fishing with crankbaits is something that every serious angler will learn sooner or later, and when you’re ready to fish crankbaits you’ll want to pick up the best crankbait along the best equipment tackle, line, and even the best knot giving you an edge with life-like presentation and strength to set the big fish.

What are the Types of Crankbaits?

Crankbaits are lures made in the shape of a baitfish separated into 3 types:

  1. Diving depth depends on size & bill shape on retrieve-shallow, medium, deep & extra deep.
  2. The sound produced makes sounds called “rattling”, or staying quiet called “silent”
  3. Lipless-Lipless- .………………………………………Read more

JimGalloway Author/Editor

References:

US Angler-How to Tie a Crankbait: Pros and Cons of the Most Popular Techniques

FAQ’s:

Q: What type of fishing line should I use for tying a crankbait? A: The type of fishing line you choose depends on various factors such as water conditions, target species, and personal preference. Common options include monofilament, fluorocarbon, and braided lines. Monofilament is affordable and offers stretch, fluorocarbon has low visibility and sinks, while braided line provides strength and sensitivity.

Q: How do I choose the right size and color of crankbait? A: Selecting the right size and color of crankbait depends on the type of fish you’re targeting and the conditions you’re fishing in. Match the size of the crankbait to the size of the fish’s natural prey in the area. As for color, consider water clarity and light conditions. Bright colors work well in murky water, while natural or translucent colors are effective in clear water.

Q: Should I use a snap or tie directly to the crankbait? A: Both methods can be effective, but tying directly to the crankbait is often preferred for better lure action and sensitivity. However, using a snap allows for quick changes of lures without retying knots. Experiment with both methods to see which works best for your fishing style and conditions.

Q: How do I know if my crankbait is running at the right depth? A: The depth at which your crankbait runs depends on several factors, including the design of the lure and your retrieval speed. Most crankbaits are labeled with their diving depth range. Experiment with different retrieval speeds and rod angles to achieve the desired depth.

Q: What are some tips for effectively fishing with crankbaits? A: To maximize your success with crankbaits, vary your retrieval speed to mimic the movement of prey, and target areas with structure and cover where fish are likely to hide. Pay attention to the vibrations and feedback from your rod tip, as strikes often occur when fish hit the lure. Additionally, be patient and persistent, as fishing with crankbaits can require time and practice to master.

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